Hoboken, The Mile Square City, nestled along the Hudson River, is perhaps best known as the birthplace of modern baseball as well as pop, jazz, and holiday icon Frank Sinatra. Though these commonly come to mind, there is much more to discover about Hoboken than you think. The Italian and Italian American communities have a long immigrant history dating back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Italian Neighborhood Guide: Hoboken, NJ 

When people speak of la dolce vita, images of the summer most often come to mind – views of the Mediterranean ocean from dreamy seaside places like Sicily and the Amalfi Coast or of rolling green hills in Tuscany and Umbria. Winter is rarely considered, but that doesn’t mean that the season needs to be associated with doom and gloom.

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The 10 Best Ski and Snowboarding Resorts in Italy

Connecticut is home to a plethora of great pizza. From classic New Haven locations that have drawn pizza lovers since the 1920s or ‘30s to new school spots offering everything from Napolitano to New York to Detroit-style pizza, Connecticut has something for every pizza lover.

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Must Try Pizza Places For Your Next Trip to Connecticut

New York City may be home to the largest population of Italian Americans in the United States, but it’s not the only hub of Italian culture in the Empire State worth exploring.

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Italian Neighborhood Guide to Upstate New York: Syracuse, Binghamton, Utica, Watertown, and Rochester

There is a running joke in Italy that the region of Molise simply does not exist. One of Italy’s smallest, poorest, and arguably least known regions, Molise has always lived on the fringes of Italian consciousness. It is merely a blip in international circles. While travel writers obsess over the rest of Italy, this land of livestock and valleys, the proverbial Wild West of Italy, rarely even comes up in travel magazines. For the past few years, the idea of a nonexistent Molise has been immortalized through the banalest of things – a hashtag. The hashtag, #ilmolisenonesiste (Molise doesn’t exist), has been used more than 14,000 times on Instagram alone.

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Notes From a Forgotten Part of Italy

Fall hiking in Italy is a feast for the eyes. Hilltop towns, Renaissance art, vineyards, delicious regional cuisine, and, of course, spectacular fall foliage mean that Italian hiking holidays are about more than just hiking. Plus, add in cooler temperatures and an artist’s palette of autumnal colors, and you’ll have an experience that you couldn’t find anywhere else.

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The Most Breathtaking Hikes in Italy for the Fall

The West is more known for where the deer and the antelope play. It’s the home of rolling hills, open skies, and desert plains. Traveling out to the west, you’ll find a BBQ joint on every corner, or a Qdoba (the western equivalent of Chipotle) before you find anything truly “Italian.”

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Eating A Godfather Sandwich in Wyoming

The Little Italy section of the Bronx, which traces its roots to the 1700s, has changed in some ways, but it’s the foundational traits of the neighborhood that continue to draw hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.

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Italian Neighborhood Guide: Bronx Little Italy

The official symbol of Providence’s Little Italy, nicknamed Federal Hill, is a pinecone. They can be seen hanging from various structures and adorning official neighborhood websites. Although they’re sometimes jokingly mistaken for pineapples, the pinecone, a traditional Italian symbol of abundance and quality, is an apt image for a neighborhood that has experienced incredible economic success in recent years.

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Little Italy Neighborhood Guide: Providence, RI

A state of 3.5 million residents situated between New York City and Boston, Connecticut is rich in Italian tradition in many of its cities, but none has a wider national influence than New Haven. In fact, some in “the nutmeg state” say that “Elm City” is home to the best pizza in America.

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Italian Neighborhood Guide: Little Italy New Haven, CT