A Guide to the Best Day Trips from Napoli

Here are the top 10 best places to visit for the day from Napoli

Naples is often known as the cultural capital of Southern Italy for its blend of tradition, passion, and grit. The Neapolitan people have a strong sense of identity, and their dialect reaches far outside the metropolitan borders. With the Mediterranean sun seeping through the narrow streets of the centro storico, you will encounter fantastic street art, an unparalleled food scene, and the charming, yet chaotic soul of the Southern metropolis. In the area surrounding Naples, there is so much to explore. From ancient ruins to beautiful palaces and Mediterranean islands, you won’t want to miss the incredible destinations. 

Here are 10-day trips to take from Naples:             

Bagno Elena

Considered the most famous beach in Naples, Bagno Elena is the perfect place to relax without traveling very far. The scenic beach is situated with a premiere view of Palazzo Donna Anna, and it has been welcoming visitors since the 1800s.

Pozzuoli

About 30 minutes west of Naples is the lovely Pozzuoli and the breathtaking area of the Phlegraean Fields, known as Campi Flegrei. As an alternative to the Amalfi Coast, Pozzuoli is rich in archeological heritage, delicious seafood, and the warm spirit of the local people. Specializing in curated experiences, All Street Napoli can take you on a one-of-a-kind excursion to Pozzuoli so you can soak in the Southern dolce vita.

Herculaneum

Almost 2,000 years ago, both the ancient Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried in ash after a devastating volcanic eruption of Mount Vesuvius. West of the volcano, Ercolano - Herculaneum in Italian - is the more well-preserved archeological site because at the time of the eruption the humid ground allowed volcanic debris to create a deep rock layer around the city, preserving its remains. Many of the frescoes and mosaics display vibrant colors, even today. Only a 15-minute drive south of Naples, Herculaneum is an ideal stop for curious day-trippers.

Oplontis

Like Pompeii and Herculaneum, the town of Oplontis also suffered devastation from the Mount Vesuvius eruptions. During archaeological excavations, a huge and lavish Roman villa was discovered known as Villa Poppaea. It is believed to have been associated with Poppaea Sabina, Emperor Nero’s wife. Compared to its famous neighbors, Villa Poppaea - with its brilliant frescoes, large gardens, and marble columns - is vastly underrated and the lavishness of the villa suggests it was fit for Roman nobility. 

The sunken city of Baia

Before the modern-day town of Bacoli, there was the ancient Roman city of Baia. This classical resort city was reserved for the luxurious and self-indulgent Roman elite. Often thought of as the “Sin City” of its day, this area was impacted by a phenomenon called bradisismo or bradyseism in English. This gradual uplifting of the ground caused important ruins to sink into the sea such as imperial baths, mosaics, statues, and marble floors. Today, the area is protected by the Archaeological Marine Park of Baia and there are 8 underwater sites that you can reach by snorkeling or scuba diving.

Capri

Just off the Sorrento peninsula lies one of Italy’s most famous islands, Capri. The delicious food, incredible shopping, and stunning views keep visitors returning to this chic oasis. While the town of Capri is known to be a destination for the rich and famous, you must also visit the island’s other town with a more local atmosphere called Ana Capri. You can take a chair lift to the top of Monte Solaro in Ana Capri and marvel at the natural beauty of the sapphire sea and the amazing Faraglioni.

Ischia

Ischia is a large volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples, known as the “Green Island.” Only a one-hour ferry ride from Naples, you will find natural hot springs and large sandy beaches on this lush island. What makes Ischia special is its authenticity of Italian island life. Take a spin on land with Personalized Italy in a stylish Ape Calessino to soak in the magic. 

Procida

Another treasure located in the Bay of Naples is the tiny island of Procida. If you’re looking to escape mass tourism the friendly villages, bright colorful houses, and slow life in Procida are for you. This secret destination is so special that it has earned the title of Italy’s Capital of Culture for 2022. 


Reggia di Caserta

After a 30-minute drive outside of Naples, you’ll reach the opulent 18th-century Baroque Palace, Reggia di Caserta. This incredible palace is rich in history, spectacular grounds, and an elaborate art collection. Just behind the palace, you’ll find impeccably groomed gardens inspired by the Park of Versailles called the Caserta Palace Park. 

Paestum 

Located in Southern Campania is the ancient Greek city of Paestum. It is one of the most often overlooked archeological sites in Italy. The area is home to ruins of three Greek temples, ancient city piazzas, and artifacts. Paestum is also a gateway to the Cilento Coast, which is one of the most beautiful, and less traveled coastlines in the country. 

Arianna DiCicco

Arianna DiCicco is an educator and writer from California, born into an Italian American restaurant family with strong ties to her grandparents’ home in Abruzzo, Italy. She has lived in San Francisco, Rome, and New York City where she’s made deep connections within the Italian communities and gained new perspectives about her own culture. With a Masters in International Education, Arianna has a love and passion for learning and educating others about Italian history & culture.

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